I am the co-editor of The Alpine Review, which we like to call a slow magazine for turbulent times. It’s a tough creature to describe, but my favourite attempt is in Ruth Jamieson’s excellent book Print is Dead, Long Live Print, where she describes it as “The Economist’s cooler, better dressed sister.”

Other than that, I’ll just say that before I was asked to join as an editor, I thought of it as one of the most exciting independent mags on the planet. Now that I make it, I can’t rightly say that, but I can say that over 400 or so annual-ish pages, we have a lot of fun, with a lot of great writers, traversing time and space and playing with the big questions of what and why we are, who we’ve been and who we will be.

Issue 3, my first issue manning the ship alongside Louis-Jacques Darveau, working with the brilliant team of Elise Eskanazi, Anna Duckworth, John Di Palma and Eli Burnstein, is out now. It’s a trip, I promise.

Previously, I was the editor of the quar­terly Australian mag­a­zine Dumbo Feather, a mag­a­zine about extra­or­di­nary ideas and the peo­ple behind them. It’s a mag­a­zine that’s beau­ti­ful and rad­i­cal in form and con­tent, largely based around long (really long) inter­views, beau­ti­ful pho­tog­ra­phy, and diver­sions inspired by the fea­tured con­ver­sa­tions. In collaboration with Stuart Geddes, Jessica Friedmann and the team at Small Giants, I reinvented everything about this magazine, building something that was entirely new but retained the soul of what came before. In my time at the helm, the mag­a­zine grew rapidly, both within Australia and overseas. To this day it’s a deeply loved and unique creature, thriving under a new editorial team.

Though this was by no means a solo operation, and some of my best relationships with fellow magazine makers (fellow edit staff, writers, photographers, art directors) began here, I did get to speak to some pretty incredible people for Dumbo. These are some of my faves that are still online: